Tagged: coping mechanisms

1

Learning to Ground Oneself

As someone with anxiety, I have learned, and maybe you have too, the tool to help you when you are feeling a panic attack. It is to think of five things you can see, four you can hear, three you can touch, two you can smell, (and one maybe taste). This act of bringing yourself to the present moment can be classified as grounding oneself. While very useful, I find that this is sometimes not enough.

6

Stress Cleaning

It’s often late at night when my mind is racing between the items on my to do list and the upcoming day that I find myself on a mission to clean.

3

Lessons Learned from Adult Coloring Books

I never had an outlet for me to calm down my negative energy, rage, frustration, or even confusion over the years. Although, one day I came across something I used to joke about – adult coloring books. Yes, these trendy, yet almost elementary coloring books I used to mock actually saved me in many dark times.

4

Pick Three: Being Productive During Bad Days

If you are like me and have emotional dysregulation, then you know that some days you are going to be better than others. There are days when out of the blue, I decide to rearrange my room, and some where I hardly want to get out of bed.

2

Understanding the Mental Health Effects from COVID-19

There are tons of resources online addressing the mental health effects that are resulting because of the constant COVID news, self-isolation, and the uncertainty about when this will all be over. And that’s a good thing! It can also feel overwhelming to be told how we should be coping and told that feeling vulnerable to depressive and anxious episodes is almost inevitable.

4

A Quiet Quarantine

I know we are all going through a similar experience right now. Boredom. Stress. Anxiety. Confusion and fear. Probably infinite amounts of feelings. If there is one thing I have realized during this quarantine, it is that you never know how you will react to things until they have happened.

1

Conducting a Body Scan

If you attend therapy or have delved into any sort of mindfulness practice, you may have heard of something called a body scan. If not, it’s exactly what it sounds like (though probably a little less medically intensive).