Author: Moderator ★

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YA Books about Mental Health

We often use fictional novels as a means of escaping, to explore new worlds and living the lives of characters as a means of getting away from our own. And although fictional books are just that, fiction, stories are almost always reflective of things going on in reality.

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Tapping into a Little Nostalgia

While it’s always fun going down memory lane, you’re probably finding yourself reminiscing about the past and the “good times” a lot more than usual lately.

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An Online Guide to Medications

The idea of taking antidepressants or any other medication to support your mental health can sound intimidating and almost scary at first. You might have a ton of questions about which is the most effective for you, how they might affect you, the potential side effects, or even just how to pronounce the names.

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When did You Get Your First Phone?

It’s difficult to truly disconnect from technology today. Even if you take a break from your phone, lock up your tablet to let it collect dust, or haven’t watched a show on an actual TV in months, screens are still everywhere. There’s electronic billboards, signs with pleasant robotic voices that dictate when the next bus or train is about to arrive, and TVs in stores displaying fashion shows, music videos, and anything else related to the content that they’re selling.

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Creating a Positive Transition this Fall

As we enter the sixth month of quarantine, you might be feeling stale, exhausted, stressed, and most likely all of the above. At this point, transition is almost a point of everyday routine, with the new information about the virus and corresponding regulations coming in and workplaces and schools constantly shifting how they go about things.

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Asian American Mental Health Resources

This week, we wanted to highlight how mental health affects Asian Americans. Asian American teen girls have the highest rates of depressive symptoms of any ethnic and gender group, Southeast Asian Americans experience high stress due to the threat of deportations, and Asian adolescents who face racial discrimination are more likely to experience depressive symptoms.

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Meme-ing About the Worst Year Ever

Memes, quite honestly, can be a great coping mechanism. Using humor as a way to deal with terrible things going on allow us to find some sort of happiness among the sea of bad, and using humor and memes online can help disrupt doomscrolling. Many have found that memes can serve as a bonding activity in a way, allowing all of us who have been affected by negative things to share a laugh and make us feel less alone.

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Voices of Youth

A lot of the times, it feels like people who speak for adolescents and how and why they feel the way they do…aren’t adolescents. While some of this makes sense – therapists and mental health experts for example have the background to explain why adolescents may experience the things they do – it can get frustrating seeing news stories and reports talking about what adolescents are going through without actually talking to them.

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Digital Overload

How many devices do you have? Do you have a phone, laptop, tablet, and wearable? How about an ebook reader? How many social media accounts do you have?  If all those questions feel overwhelming,...

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The Green Ribbon Library

The Green Room Library is a developing platform designed to give adolescents, parents, caregivers, and more the opportunity to view educational videos on a variety of topics that can impact the mental health of teens and young adults.